Are Cane Corsos Good
For First-Time Owners?
Or Are They More For Experienced Owners?

If you’re ready to get a dog for the first time, you might be tempted to get a large dog like the Cane Corso. However, if you’ve never dealt with a dog or had experience in caring for dogs, a large dog’s needs might become overwhelming. Would a Cane Corso be right for you?

Cane Corsos are not particularly good for first-time owners because they require more work and care than other dogs and might be overwhelming for you. Because they are large and active, they don’t do well in a small house or apartment. They are also stubborn and need a firm hand to guide them.

Before you adopt a Cane Corso, you’ll want to read ahead to find out what challenges and disadvantages you may face with this type of dog and if your home and property are big enough for a large, active dog. Read More Below...

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Girl with Cane Corso

What Is the Cane Corso Heritage?

The Cane Corso is related to the Italian Mastiff, and the breed goes back to Roman war dogs before the fall of the Roman empire. They are larger dogs that can weigh up to 120 pounds (55 kgs). They were originally bred to be work and protection dogs, and many of the first Corsos were warrior dogs who fought by the Roman soldier’s side. 

Later, they were used as hunting dogs because of their abilities to chase and corner larger animals. 

They are protective, and unless they are heavily socialized as puppies, they will attack neighbors or visitors if they come into your home. This is due to what they were bred to do: to work hard beside their owners and protect them should any threat arise. 

Because of industrialization, and the Corso was not needed as much in daily life, they almost went extinct. After the second world war, they all died out, as there were very few dogs of this breed alive anymore. However, by the 1970s, due to responsible breeders’ action, they began showing up in homes and dog shows throughout Europe by the mid-1990s. 

In the early 2000s, they were brought to the United States and earned recognition by the American Kennel Club.
 

Are Cane Corsos Good House Dogs?

For being a large dog, the Cane Corso doesn’t make too much noise, nor do they take part in the chaos that your kids or other animals love so much. They will sit to the side and watch the proceedings rather than participate. However, other large breeds are louder and more playful than the Corso. 

They are protective and territorial, so if someone were to break into your home, your Corso would rush to protect their home, but that doesn’t mean that they are aggressive dogs. It just means that they choose their battles. 

Since they are large dogs, they more than likely wouldn’t be comfortable in a very small home. They need room to move and rest comfortably, and a small one-bedroom apartment or house might be too small for a Corso. If you have a larger home or even a medium-sized home, a Corso makes a good house dog.

A backyard with a shelter might be a better option for your dog, as they prefer to be able to run around and play. In cold weather, they will need to come inside.

Here's another article of ours you might find of interest about whether this breed is a better inside or outside dog.


Pro-tip: Does your Cane Corso have issues with anxiety, destructive chewing, aggressiveness, jumping up, barking or fearfulness?

Brain Training For Dogs is an excellent online training course that
addresses these behavioral issues as well as dog training basics.

Are Cane Corsos Good Protection Dogs?

Cane Corso dogs are usually laid back and calm, so it might come as a surprise to many people that they can be fierce when the situation arises. When the Corso bonds to their human master, the bonds are for life, and when their human becomes threatened, they immediately spring into action to eliminate the threat. 

However, just because a Corso will fight to protect their home and loved ones, it doesn’t mean that they will go looking for a fight like some breeds. They try to avoid fighting whenever possible and stay back until something comes up where they need to spring into action.

If you are the type of person who enjoys entertaining, with several visitors in your home all the time, you might not want to get a Corso. They will constantly be ready to fight, and it could stress them to the point of depression and illness. 

However, if you live a solitary life and rarely have people over, a Corso should fit into your life and routine. 

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Are Cane Corsos Protective?

As already mentioned, Cane Corsos are protective and territorial. They do well with protection-type exercises and stimulation. 

Current advice for Corso care is to provide stimulation and activities where they can solve problems, use their natural tracking abilities, and compete in dog sports. These activities keep Corsos active, and it hones their natural protective natures to prepare them for dangerous situations. 

If you’ve had a dog in the past and you have experience in a dog’s protective instincts, then a Corso should be a good dog for you. However, if you are a first-time dog parent, you may need to start with a dog breed that isn’t as aggressive or protective as a Corso. Unless you have a strong personality where you can control a Corso’s protective nature, a Cane Corso is not for you.

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Are Cane Corsos Kid-Friendly?

The question to ask instead is, “Are kids Cane Corso-friendly?” Cane Corsos are mild-tempered and can be in a home with kids. However, a Corso’s ears are more sensitive to pain than the rest of its body, and small kids are more prone to pull on animals’ ears, which can prove to be very painful for the dog.

Cane Corsos are better for families with older children who know how to behave around larger animals. They don’t need to be supervised as closely with older children due to the size of the dog versus younger children. However, they are very friendly dogs who enjoy the company of kids and adults.

Learn More...Here's an article of ours that answers the question about whether Canes are good family dogs.

Cane Corsos With Other Pets

These dogs can get along with other dogs of the same or other breeds but should not be in a home with a dog of the same gender, as this could cause territorial disputes or fights. Early socialization of puppies should happen while still at the breeder’s home or business, so they can learn how to get along with other animals and people at a young age. 

Can they get along with cats? That depends on the cat’s nature and how early a Corso’s socialization started. Cats and dogs can get along if introduced in a non-threatening way. 

For all animals/pets, the steps to introduce your Corso to your pets include the following:

  • Put your other pet in a closed room with food, water, a bed, and a litter box if your pet is a cat.
  • Let your Corso puppy roam the house for a bit to smell the place for a while. 
  • Place blankets from both pets near the other to get used to their smells.
  • Supervise their in-person meetings when they are ready to meet. 
  • Let them be in the same room for a while, and discourage any fights.

For Further Reading...
Cane Corso Good And Bad - This article of ours will further enlighten to their pros and cons which is a must read before bringing one home.

Are Cane Corso Aggressive Or Dangerous? - Our article here delves deeper into their aggressive side so owners aren't caught by surprise.

Conclusion

Dogs are bred for several different purposes, including sitting on their owners’ laps and working on the farm. Different breeds have vastly different temperaments, and if you adopt a dog whose temperament is vastly different than what you’re looking for, the results could be disastrous. 

If you are a first-time dog owner and don’t have space for a large dog, you may want to consider a smaller dog. You may want to look for a lower energy dog if you are not active. Once you get used to caring for dogs, you could probably get a Cane Corso later.

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